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This is the Sunday Series, a peek of things in the art music world.

Music has a close bound with architecture for quite some time. Concert halls are also the ones which effects the music and also effected by music. They have also given birth to great architecture designs in the globe.

This series presents the beauty of the structure, in which music creativity flows abundantly.

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Inaugurated in 1900, Boston Symphony Hall is considered one of the best symphonic hall in the world. It adopted a traditional shoebox shape which is very popular in Europe. Shoebox hall shape is a shape of a concert hall which is very similar to a shoe box, long way down the hall with narrow balconies.

It is 61 feet high, 75 feet wide, and 125 long from the lower back wall to the front of the stage. Stage walls slope inward to help focus the sound. With the exception of its wooden floors, the Hall is built of brick, steel, and plaster, with modest decoration. Side balconies are very shallow to avoid trapping or muffling sound, and the coffered ceiling and statue-filled niches along three sides help provide excellent acoustics to essentially every seat.

The hall’s leather seats are still original from 1900. The hall seats 2,625 people during Symphony season, 2,371 during the Pops season, and up to 800 for dinner.

This hall is the home for Boston Symphony Orchestra, one of the best seven orchestras in the United States. The orchestra is now led by James Levine.

The Symphony Hall organ, a 4,800-pipe Aeolian-Skinner (Opus 1134) designed by G. Donald Harrison, installed in 1949, and autographed by Albert Schweitzer, is considered one of the finest concert hall organs in the world. It replaced the hall’s first organ, built in 1900 by George S. Hutchings of Boston, which was electrically keyed, with 62 ranks of nearly 4,000 pipes set in a chamber 12 feet deep and 40 feet high. The Hutchings organ had fallen out of fashion by the 1940s when lighter, clearer tones became preferred. E. Power Biggs, often a featured organist for the orchestra, lobbied hard for a thinner bass sound and accentuated treble.

The 1949 Aeolian-Skinner reused and modified more than 60% of the existing Hutchings pipes and added 600 new pipes in a Positiv division. The original diapason pipes, 32 feet in length, were reportedly sawed into manageable pieces for disposal in 1948.

~ all infos are from wikipedia

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